Review: Selena Gomez’s ‘Revelacion’ is the change that pop music culture needs

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TRL’s Lily Bouldin says “I believe that you do not need to be Spanish speaking to listen to this EP because as I have mentioned many times throughout this review, her voice speaks for the passion and power she is trying to express.”

In all honesty, I try to stray away from everything that tends to play on the radio, or in other words “pop” artists, such as Justin Beiber, Cardi B and Taylor Swift tend to make me switch the station or turn it off completely. Although Selena Gomez’s extended play (EP), “Revelacion,” falls within the 106.1 category, its connection with Spanish culture sets it apart from many other pop artist songs.

The EP was released March 12, contains seven songs, with three of them consisting of collaborations with other artists. At first glance, The EP is very different from Gomez’ previous albums with a big Spanish influence in each song. Not only are the song titles represented in Spanish, but each song is sung in elegant, breathy Spanish. Gomez learned the language from her father of Mexican descent and has turned her knowledge into a beautiful EP that will be predicted to No.1. 

Although many of the songs have similar instrumental backgrounds, such as drum, guitar and  strong bass, the song that sticks out to me is “Adios.” The bass makes you want to tap your feet to the song and causes you to feel emotion through the song. Gomez sings with power and spite in this song the most but protects her elegant and soft voice throughout. 

Gomez began talking about her EP in 2010, when she tweeted “can’t wait for y’all to hear the Spanish record.” Eleven years later, Gomez released “Revelacion” to express her Hispanic roots and attract many from all around the world. I truly believe that anybody can enjoy this EP, as Gomez is singing about love and direction, something that everybody can find relatable. The same artist that brought you many songs throughout your childhood such as “Lose You To Love Me” and “Same Old Love” is now portraying a different artist that is only recognizable by the passion that is portrayed in her voice. 

Gomez includes one English song title in the EP with features from DJ Snake. Although a lot of this song, “Selfish Love” is English speaking, she does still implicate a little bit of Spanish. This adds character to “Selfish Love,” and those that only speak English will still be able to enjoy her EP and understand what the lyrics are while singing along. 

I believe that this EP is the change that pop music culture needs, and I predict that it will be a great hit on all radios. Although it took Selena 11 years, it was much worth the wait and I hope she continues to produce music like this. I believe that you do not need to be Spanish speaking to listen to this EP because as I have mentioned many times throughout this review, her voice speaks for the passion and power she is trying to express. 

Rating: A