Leopard Look: Cyndi Anderson

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Amiya Callicutt

English II teacher Cynthia Anderson talks about the SEL assignment for the day to her class. Anderson previously taught at Sloan Creek, and she is now the replacement for Ms. Todd.

Cyndi Anderson teaches English 1, GT English 1 and GT English 2 for ninth and 10th graders. Anderson previously taught as Sloan Creek. 

At A Glance

Favorite restaurant: Don Don Poke Bowl or Salt Light Station 

Favorite hobby: Traveling and reading 

Favorite book: “Wonder”

Years spent teaching: 17 years 

Looking Deeper

The Red Leder: What was the reason you moved schools? Where were you before? 

Cyndi Anderson: I was at Sloan Creek for the past seven-and-a-half years. The reason I moved to this school was not planned. Ms. Todd, who had this position, left to follow some pursuits, and I know how hard it is mid year and to say goodbye to some of those kids. By coming to the high school, I get to see faces I haven’t seen in a while. I taught fifth and sixth grade and GT for so long. A lot of my friends from the past I see again in the classroom. That family connection in the community made it a lot easier to move from one school to another. 

TRL: What do you love most about teaching? 

CA: I [want] to make sure I am helping create world changers. [This generation] is going to change the world, and I’ve seen them do it already. What I look forward to in high school is people coming into who they are. They are not only going to change the world, but how are they going to do it. 

TRL: What do you hope your students take away from your class by the end of the year? 

CA: I hope that they take away confidence and the belief that they will make a difference. [I hope] they find that niche that they need to be in to make a difference in the world. 

TRL: How is the semester going so far, what have been some challenges or frustrating moments? 

CA: My obstacles are mostly created by myself. I started on a three day week, and I’m trying to learn everything new and am trying to put my own spin on things. [Meanwhile], things are still happening in the world that we couldn’t imagine. My first day on campus was when the events at The Capitol happened. The hardest things have been trying to teach during a pandemic and some of the crazy things happening in the world. 

TRL: What have been the most rewarding moments of teaching at the high school? 

CA: First of all, it has been amazing so far because the staff here have been amazing to me. All my students have been so kind and compassionate. They have been so gracious with me as I adapt to a new environment. The whole staff in general have just made me feel at home. 

TRL: How is the high school teaching experience different? 

CA: It’s quieter. I’m always amazed by how quiet the halls are, in my classroom when people are waiting for the bell to ring they talk quietly. My fifth and sixth graders are very loud. [The highschool students] take responsibility and most of my students seem to really care about their future now and care about taking care of their work. 

TRL: What is one value you hope to implement in your students this year?

CA: Compassion and grace. Every year I choose one word. At the beginning of the pandemic, my word was “connect.” I had to focus on how to make connections during the pandemic. This year, I had thought about it and my word is “grace.” This is because students have given me grace, we are all dealing with so many different things. Whether you are virtual or on campus, it has been a hard year. I want my students to come into a situation and treat everyone with the grace they deserve. you don’t know what’s going on behind that mask.