A change in anatomy

Science course revamped for new school year

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A change in anatomy

Theresa Dollinger works with seniors Abby Eaton and Eleise Brooks during rat dissections.

Theresa Dollinger works with seniors Abby Eaton and Eleise Brooks during rat dissections.

Courtesy of Daniela Bengino

Theresa Dollinger works with seniors Abby Eaton and Eleise Brooks during rat dissections.

Courtesy of Daniela Bengino

Courtesy of Daniela Bengino

Theresa Dollinger works with seniors Abby Eaton and Eleise Brooks during rat dissections.

Nnenna Nchege, Staff Writer

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The anatomy and physiology program, headed by Theresa Dollinger, is undergoing changes to the curriculum this school year.

“We wanted to step up the rigor of the class and make sure the students are learning anatomy and physiology,” Dollinger said. “I wanted to incorporate more labs, activities, and hands on things. Not only are they learning anatomy and physiology, but they’re getting to see it, too.”

Despite rumors about the changes prior to school starting, the number of students interested in the course has not changed.

“I’m not sure they all understood the changes that were being made,” Dollinger said. “It is not my intent to make it a super-hard class. I don’t want to make it the hardest class on campus, but I do want them to learn something.”

Senior Mikey Franks said he had initially chosen anatomy and physiology as an alternate because he wanted “a fulfilling schedule” of classes for his senior year.

“When I did hear it was getting changed, and I had an opportunity to switch my schedule, that’s when I decided to take anatomy and physiology because it also fulfils my endorsement credit,” Franks said.

There will be quizzes and tests throughout the year for the first time. In the past, students’ grades were based off a combination of information, Dollinger said.

“I think most of [the students] appreciate the change that we’re making in the curriculum,” Dollinger said. “I think some of them are a little hesitant because it is their senior year, and I know they would like to really know the information.”  

Although some students just take the course to fill a spot in their schedule, Dollinger said many students have an actual desire learn about the human body and later hope to make a career out of it.

“A lot of the students that take anatomy are in the health science field or want to be in it, and anatomy is a huge stepping stone for that,” Dollinger said. “If they can get a baseline this year, when they do go on to their fields in college, it’s going to be that much more helpful.”

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