From Lovejoy to Louisiana

Campaign spreads aid to flooded Lafayette area

Parents Lisa Hopkinson, Jennifer Waldrop and Brie Smith began a book drive that ran this week to aid schools that fell victim to August's flooding.

Parents Lisa Hopkinson, Jennifer Waldrop and Brie Smith began a book drive that ran this week to aid schools that fell victim to August's flooding.

Katie Felton, Staff Reporter

After the recent Louisiana floodings, parents Lisa Hopkinson, Jennifer Waldrop, and Brie Smith decided to take action into their own hands and started the “Spreading Lovejoy” campaign. The campaign began on Wednesday, Sept. 14 and will continue through Friday, Sept. 16.

“The purpose of ‘Spreading Lovejoy Across State Lines’ is to extend our community service to those in need regardless of their location,” Hopkinson said. “The inspiration for beginning this campaign is that the 2016 flood affected many of our Lovejoy families and friends. Several of our staff, administration, and families of Lovejoy have immediate and extended family in Louisiana as well as close friends.”

This event is occurring on all campuses, including the Red Building. Students and staff are encouraged to bring in loose change and books to help support victims of the flood. Cash donations will be given to the United Way of Acadiana and their 2016 Flood Victim fund. This will serve the victims from the Lafayette, La. area.

“The donation of books will be our attempt to help rebuild two school libraries and teacher classrooms in the Denham Springs, Louisiana area,” Hopkinson said. “Because of the flood of 2016, several schools in East Baton Rouge Parish had significant damage, a few losing all of the books in the libraries and teacher classrooms. Many that sustained devastating damages did not have flood insurance to help finance their rebuild. This fund will provide assistance for these uninsured residents.”

Hopkinson wants more out of “Spreading Lovejoy” than just a chance to give back to the community.

“My hope is that the students of Lovejoy realize how reaching community service truly can be, and it doesn’t have to be just in their backyard,” Hopkinson said. “I want our students to understand that community service is an act that should become part of their everyday DNA. Something that they will carry with them for the rest of their life.”