Behind the scenes of the Broadcast team

Amy Minix, Staff Reporter

Many students and staff members enjoy watching the “Daily Update” and “LNN Weekly News”, but most people do not know about all the work that goes on behind the scenes to make these productions a reality.

“First, the scripts must all be written up so we know exactly how long the show will be and what the content is,” junior broadcast student Seth Royer said. “Next, the script must be transferred to the prompter for the anchors to read. All graphics for the TV, transitions before video, and pledges must be ready pre-show. Finally, you test the audio, get dressed, mic up, and go.”

In order to keep everybody informed,, the broadcast team has to be updated daily on what is going on around campus, while also making sure the set is ready to go.

“We have to write new scripts every day, based on all the announcements people send Mr. Higgins, then we have to make sure the set is good to go and check to make sure the lights, sound, and video equipment is working,” junior broadcast student Anna Ellison said.

But even if all that is in perfect condition, there is one element left: the person delivering the news.

“This year were trying to set some permanent anchors for the Daily Update,” senior Kelly Fulton said. “We’re trying this thing where we audition everybody and we will eventually choose someone different.”

These trials help new broadcast students get a feel of what it is like being on-camera live.

“I was really scared at first, but when the second time came around it was easier,” junior broadcast student Jonah Barth said. “It doesn’t really feel like you’re live in front of everybody; it’s just you in a room talking with a teleprompter. If you don’t worry about how everybody is watching you it’s no big deal.”

The “Daily Update” airs twice a day during fourth period; once at the beginning of A lunch and again at C lunch, and the weekly news airs every Friday.

“To make sure everybody gets to see the announcements, we have started doing them twice during fourth period rather than once during first,” Ellison said.

In order to guarantee everything is done correctly, producers of the “Daily Update” work hard every day, sometimes for several hours after school.

“It’s a very time consuming class and being a producer, it’s kind of taken over my life in some aspects,” Ellison said.

Despite all of the long hours, broadcast students feel the hard work is worth it.

“I like being a part of the daily update because it makes me feel like I’m really contributing to the class. I like having the responsibility because I’ve never really been in charge of something before and I enjoy having something that’s my project,” Fulton said.

Every year, the broadcast team tries to mix things up a little.

“This year, we are trying to do the weekly show live as well as the daily announcements,” Ellison said.

In order for students to be enrolled in broadcast, they must have taken prerequisites and have the approval from the class’s teacher, Brian Higgins. For those who want to go into the video/media world in the future, broadcast is a first step that provides some experience in the occupation.

“I love talking in front of people and eventually want to have a career in the broadcast field,” Royer said.